Qataris don’t want drug addicts, homosexuals and heavy drinkers as neighbors

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Qatar public opinion on neighbors

A no no

In Qatar, when asked who they would not want to live next door, the responses came in this order: drug addicts, homosexuals and heavy drinkers. A full 95% of respondents said that they would not like to have drug addicts as neighbours – more than 10 times the number who said they would not like to have a person of a different race living next to them. A similar level of dislike concerning drug addicts living close by was expressed by the respondents from Belarus, Taiwan, and the Philippines, whereas Latin American countries expressed the lowest aversion to drug addicts, albeit still decisively stating they would not want them as neighbors, with Ecuadorians being most tolerant ones at 54%.

Homosexuality seems to be an issue in Qatar with nationals placing it on the second spot of most unwanted people to live next to, trailing only drug addicts. An even stronger aversion to gay neighbors can be found in Azerbaijan (94.4%), Armenia (92.7%), and Zimbabwe (90.2%), while Western European nations seem not to mind at all, with only a small minority saying they would not want to live next to people of a different sexual orientation: Sweden (4.2%), Spain (5.1%) and  Netherlands (6.9%).

The figures (which can be found on the WVS website) also showed that the majority of Qataris would not want to live next to people who had been diagnosed with AIDS, or unmarried couples who had decided to live together.

People in Qatar showed to an extent, a more moderate attitude towards immigrants and foreign workers, about 54 percent of Qataris not minding living next to members of either of those two socioeconomic groups. This however still places Qataris amongst one of the least tolerant of the 51 surveyed nationalities, with only Malaysians and Libyans expressing more dislike for having immigrants as neighbors (circa 65%).

 A go go

A high level of tolerance was displayed for groups speaking a different language, following different religion or being of a different race. People in Singapore, Peru and Morocco expressed a similar mindset for linguistic tolerance, but in stark contrast, the people of Libya, Ecuador, and South Korea came on top among countries which do not want to have different language speakers living next to them. Religious tolerance was most prominent in New Zealand, Netherlands and Uruguay, with barely 1.7% to 2.9% of respondents mentioning that they would not want to live next to a person of a different faith. On the other side of the spectrum, Armenians, Libyans and Yemenis are the least tolerant in this aspects, with 53.3% to 56.6% saying they would not want such people as neighbours.

Qataris also showed signs of tolerance for other races, with only 10% indicating they would not want them as neighbors. Similarly, Taiwan, Netherlands and Zimbabwe are on the same level as Qatar. While on the other side, people of Azerbaijan, Libya and Lebanon came out as the most racially prejudiced of all the nationalities included in the survey.

These points seem to contradict the low tolerance expressed towards immigrants and foreign workers, as it seems a bit strange that Qataris would not mind a different language speaking neighbor, but at the same time would not want a foreign worker living next to them. This would imply that Qataris don’t mind a different language speaking neighbor, as long as the person is not of a foreign background, however that doesn’t leave much people that this applies to. The other thing that this might mean is that Qataris had a particular group of people in mind when stating that they would not want to live next to immigrants and foreign workers, however that could only be determined through a more specifically defined survey.

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